Ruminations on sports, training, health, and wellness

Posts tagged “myofascial therapy

A Change of Scenery

Hi friends!

It’s time again to set aside lofty expectations of mind-expanding academic inquiry in blog post form, and present instead a newsy update of life and times in massage therapy and bodywork.

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In the beginning of November, I joined Dr. Damien Rodulfo’s sports chiropractic practice, Healing Hands Chiropractic. Just around the corner from my old digs, this office houses two chiropractors with advanced specialized training — Dr. Rodulfo and Dr. Herman — a physical therapy assistant, an acupuncturist specializing in dry needling and neuromuscular therapy, and me — sports massage therapist and science nerd extraordinaire. It is truly a dream team of allied practitioners and I am tremendously excited to be settling in and finding my niche in the practice.

download (1)This past week was my first week of class back at the Body Therapy Institute, where I attended massage school in 2009, this time taking the Advanced Myofascial Massage Certification course. This approach to bodywork more closely resembles Structural Integration or Rolfing while applying the principles of deep tissue massage to treat fascial restrictions. The concept is based on Tom Myers’ groundbreaking theory, presented in Anatomy Trains, wherein the connective tissue web that encapsulates every bone, muscle fiber, bundle of muscle tissue, and organ in the body is treated as a single unit — thus, a restriction in one extremity can affect movement and postural patterns in a completely different part of the body through the kinetic chain. The first week of class was an eye-opening and invigorating shift that turned my approach to massage on its ear (sometimes literally!), and it has really gotten me excited about the possibilities for applying this work in a sports and physical activity capacity.

As such, a unapologetic plug for my business: To complete the certification requirements, I must log several sessions of massage using these techniques between now and February, including a case study. This is your chance to get some awesome bodywork at a substantial discount. Myofascial structural massage is most effective if performed in a series with one session every week. If you book a 3-week massage series between now and February, you will receive 3 90-minute massages for just $50 each — a $120 savings. Payment in full is due at the time of the first appointment. These sessions are non-refundable for cancellation and non-transferable (re-scheduling accommodations within reason can be made). To book your myofascial structural massage series, you can call me at 336.253.4263 or book online at www.saraclawson.com (put “myofascial series” in the notes section to receive the discount). Myofascial massage is perfect for anyone — you will be able to remain clothed, move around, and notice immediate changes to posture and movement patterns. I really believe my existing and new clients alike will be impressed with the effectiveness of this approach!

2015 is shaping up to be a year of education for me: not only will I be completing my Advanced Myofascial Massage certification, but I am stepping over to the other side of the classroom as a science educator in several different venues.

post-greensboro-college-304I’m excited to be joining Greensboro College’s kinesiology department as an adjunct professor of biomechanics in January, offering a course and lab both spring and fall semesters. This is my first foray into higher education as a professor teaching a complete course, so I’m really nervous about doing a good job and getting my class excited about physics, math, and the elegantly intricate body in motion. Do you have any memories of great professors (or terrible ones) whose teaching methods have impacted your life? Let me know in the comments — I need all the help I can get!

I am also joining the faculty of Kneaded Energy School of Massage in January as the anatomy, physiology, and pathology teacher for the night program. We’ll be starting out with musculoskeletal anatomy until April, at which point I get to dive into physiology, chemistry, and pathology. This is a great step for me to bridge the gap between education and massage therapy, and I can’t wait to see the next generation of massage therapists in action as they enter the career at a time of wonderful growth and development. If you’ve ever been interested in pursuing massage as a career, KESM is a great place to start.

Also on the massage front, I am extremely excited to be offering a continuing education class of my own at the Body Therapy Institute in April: Sports and Performance Massage. If you are a massage therapist, physical therapist, or athletic trainer, this course is for you! We will be drawing from biomechanics, sports medicine, and evidence-based practice methods for therapeutic manual bodywork in an athletic setting. This is going to be a major on-your-feet, get-up-and-move class, and in the course of 3 days we’ll cover the body in motion, practical approaches to sports injuries, and coaching rehabilitative exercise to maximize performance (and save your hands). It’s a 21-hour course, which (combined with 3 hours of mandatory ethics training) satisfies the North Carolina requirement for massage therapy license renewal. We are going to have so much fun!

That’s all for now — gosh, I’m tired already just from proofreading this list, and it’s not even January! I hope the coming weeks and months hold winter wonderment for you and your family, and a special thank-you goes out to all the friends, family, clients, and mentors who have supported me on what has been a wild and amazing journey in sports medicine this year. Here’s wishing holiday cheer to all you happy runners, determined triathletes, crazy cyclists, and everyone else this year and 2015!